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St. Petersburg's Retention Water Analysis

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Artur Lysenko

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Faculty Advisor: Dr. Madhu Pandey

Description

St. Petersburg, which lies at the heart of Florida, is known to have countless retention ponds scattered across residential and commercial areas. Some of which collect more than what is seen on the surface after accumulation of runoff rainwater. While the initial purpose of retention ponds is to collect runoff water, it is unclear what is carried along with it. This research gained insight of the physical properties of the retention pond water using standard analytical techniques and equipment such as VuSitu Water Probe on four (4) distinct water samples collected roughly within three (3) mile radius from USFSP campus. The results of this research suggest that at least one retention pond has abnormal physical properties compared to the other samples collected regarding specific conductivity and total dissolved solids (ppt). Not all retention ponds are structured the same and some have mechanisms to control substances circulating within the pond. These findings suggest that further investigation may be required for areas with abnormal results using unique analytical methods such as Atomic Absorbance (AA) and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC).

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St. Petersburg's Retention Water Analysis

St. Petersburg, which lies at the heart of Florida, is known to have countless retention ponds scattered across residential and commercial areas. Some of which collect more than what is seen on the surface after accumulation of runoff rainwater. While the initial purpose of retention ponds is to collect runoff water, it is unclear what is carried along with it. This research gained insight of the physical properties of the retention pond water using standard analytical techniques and equipment such as VuSitu Water Probe on four (4) distinct water samples collected roughly within three (3) mile radius from USFSP campus. The results of this research suggest that at least one retention pond has abnormal physical properties compared to the other samples collected regarding specific conductivity and total dissolved solids (ppt). Not all retention ponds are structured the same and some have mechanisms to control substances circulating within the pond. These findings suggest that further investigation may be required for areas with abnormal results using unique analytical methods such as Atomic Absorbance (AA) and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC).

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