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Reproduction Time Between Species

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Allison Gauvey

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Faculty Advisor: Dr. Deby L. Cassill

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The most common way all animals can be categorized is by their way of reproduction. The focus of this project was to emphasize species that lay eggs. Species that lay eggs can be classified into even further groups: ovuliparity, oviparity, ovo-viviparity, histotrophic viviparity, and hemotrophic viviparity. All species analyzed for this project fall under the oviparous group. The species analyzed were goose, ostriches, sea turtles, and snakes. My hypothesis was that the sea turtles would be able to lay one egg the fastest. The research was carried out by watching five videos of each species and averaging the total time. Out of the four species, the sea turtle had the fastest reproduction time, averaging 9.4 seconds for one egg. The ostrich closely followed with an average time of 10.8 seconds. This information is relevant for the future because it provides us with the amount of time it takes for species to reproduce and continue growing their population.

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Reproduction Time Between Species

The most common way all animals can be categorized is by their way of reproduction. The focus of this project was to emphasize species that lay eggs. Species that lay eggs can be classified into even further groups: ovuliparity, oviparity, ovo-viviparity, histotrophic viviparity, and hemotrophic viviparity. All species analyzed for this project fall under the oviparous group. The species analyzed were goose, ostriches, sea turtles, and snakes. My hypothesis was that the sea turtles would be able to lay one egg the fastest. The research was carried out by watching five videos of each species and averaging the total time. Out of the four species, the sea turtle had the fastest reproduction time, averaging 9.4 seconds for one egg. The ostrich closely followed with an average time of 10.8 seconds. This information is relevant for the future because it provides us with the amount of time it takes for species to reproduce and continue growing their population.

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