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If You’re Happy and You Know It, Your Job Performance Will Show It; Job autonomy is Related to Job Performance through Job Satisfaction

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Prior research has found that job autonomy enhances performance because workers with higher job autonomy perceive that they are more trusted to perform a task, which positively affects their intrinsic motivation and the effectiveness in working (Susanti & Universitas, 2011). Additionally, when people are happier in their jobs, they take more pride in their work and this can be displayed in the quality of their work, or job performance. When individuals feel a sense of autonomy they feel in charge of their tasks, competent in their product, happier with their results. This study explores the question: When people consider themselves to be autonomous in their job, do they perform better because they are more satisfied? Previous research shows the need satisfaction and ensuing self-regulatory processes determine the shape and the size of the performance–satisfaction relationship (Heidemeier & Mosert, 2019). This study looked at a sample of one-hundred and eighty-three emerging adults aged 18-25 (56.3% male, 43.7% female; M age = 23.31 years. The sample’s race and ethnicity consist of 71.6% White/Caucasian, 17.5% African-American, 8.2% Asian, 2.7% Native Hawaiian/American, 71.6% non-Hispanic, and 28.4% Hispanic. The survey was administered to measure participants’ job satisfaction, job performance and job autonomy via self-report. To investigate job performance, this study looked at the subscales used in the Modified Job Performance Scale (MJPS): altruism, conscientiousness and task performance along with those in the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ): task performance, contextual performance and counterproductive work behavior. Results supported hypotheses as job autonomy and job satisfaction correlated with all subscales from both job performance questionnaires. Results also indicated significant indirect effects (i.e., mediation) for the all three MJPS subscales and for the task performance and contextual performance subscales of the IWPQ. Mediation was not present for links with counterproductive work behavior.

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If You’re Happy and You Know It, Your Job Performance Will Show It; Job autonomy is Related to Job Performance through Job Satisfaction

Prior research has found that job autonomy enhances performance because workers with higher job autonomy perceive that they are more trusted to perform a task, which positively affects their intrinsic motivation and the effectiveness in working (Susanti & Universitas, 2011). Additionally, when people are happier in their jobs, they take more pride in their work and this can be displayed in the quality of their work, or job performance. When individuals feel a sense of autonomy they feel in charge of their tasks, competent in their product, happier with their results. This study explores the question: When people consider themselves to be autonomous in their job, do they perform better because they are more satisfied? Previous research shows the need satisfaction and ensuing self-regulatory processes determine the shape and the size of the performance–satisfaction relationship (Heidemeier & Mosert, 2019). This study looked at a sample of one-hundred and eighty-three emerging adults aged 18-25 (56.3% male, 43.7% female; M age = 23.31 years. The sample’s race and ethnicity consist of 71.6% White/Caucasian, 17.5% African-American, 8.2% Asian, 2.7% Native Hawaiian/American, 71.6% non-Hispanic, and 28.4% Hispanic. The survey was administered to measure participants’ job satisfaction, job performance and job autonomy via self-report. To investigate job performance, this study looked at the subscales used in the Modified Job Performance Scale (MJPS): altruism, conscientiousness and task performance along with those in the Individual Work Performance Questionnaire (IWPQ): task performance, contextual performance and counterproductive work behavior. Results supported hypotheses as job autonomy and job satisfaction correlated with all subscales from both job performance questionnaires. Results also indicated significant indirect effects (i.e., mediation) for the all three MJPS subscales and for the task performance and contextual performance subscales of the IWPQ. Mediation was not present for links with counterproductive work behavior.

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