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Atopic Dermatitis (AD): A Comparative Literature Review Between Human AD and Canine AD and the Genetic Pathogenesis, Symptoms, and Treatments

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Carly Jensen

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Faculty Advisor: Dr. Michelle Green

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Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common form of eczema, a chronic skin disease, characterized by inflammation and pruritus. Although most common when young, AD can be experienced at any age. There has been significant research on the connection between animals that develop AD in relation to the disease experienced by humans. Horse, cats, and canines experience a common form of the disease, in which pathogenesis can be better studied using animal models. Canines specifically have been the study point for many AD studies, for it is most applicable to that of human AD. The purpose of this literature review was to describe the recent information on Atopic Dermatitis present on humans and canines, in terms of pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatments. The hypothesis for this research was that the increased mutations in epidermal-developing genes and proteins are the prominent cause of Atopic Dermatitis. Filaggrin produced by the FLG gene was the source of interest, for it has a major function in the development of the skin barrier and its components. A comparative method was proceeded to determine similarities between the two, in hopes to make connections on how further research should be completed. In this study, it was concluded that there are both genetic and environmental factors that influence the development of AD, much of which has to do with the mutation in epidermal producing genes (such as the FLG gene). This information may be vital in a better understanding of this convoluted disease and lead to further research.

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Atopic Dermatitis (AD): A Comparative Literature Review Between Human AD and Canine AD and the Genetic Pathogenesis, Symptoms, and Treatments

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common form of eczema, a chronic skin disease, characterized by inflammation and pruritus. Although most common when young, AD can be experienced at any age. There has been significant research on the connection between animals that develop AD in relation to the disease experienced by humans. Horse, cats, and canines experience a common form of the disease, in which pathogenesis can be better studied using animal models. Canines specifically have been the study point for many AD studies, for it is most applicable to that of human AD. The purpose of this literature review was to describe the recent information on Atopic Dermatitis present on humans and canines, in terms of pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatments. The hypothesis for this research was that the increased mutations in epidermal-developing genes and proteins are the prominent cause of Atopic Dermatitis. Filaggrin produced by the FLG gene was the source of interest, for it has a major function in the development of the skin barrier and its components. A comparative method was proceeded to determine similarities between the two, in hopes to make connections on how further research should be completed. In this study, it was concluded that there are both genetic and environmental factors that influence the development of AD, much of which has to do with the mutation in epidermal producing genes (such as the FLG gene). This information may be vital in a better understanding of this convoluted disease and lead to further research.

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